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TRAIL OF TEARS
BRAVEHORSES WARRIORS
Tuesday, 11 September 2007
BRAVEHORSES WARRIORS 11 The 4 Infantry Division
Mood:  celebratory
Now Playing: Wolf Moon by TYPE O NEGATIVE
BRAVEHORSES WARRIORS 11 The 4 Infantry Division WARRIOR MOTTO: “JUST GET IT DONE” Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) Warriors Citation 4th Infantry Division warriors have a long and distinguished history that includes combat in four wars and 21 campaign streamers adorn its colors. The Division was formed on 10 December 1917 and was commanded by Major General George H. Cameron. Over the following 87 years, more than 540,000 soldiers wore the distinctive patch of the Ivy Division on their uniforms. They established a legacy of dedicated service to the nation that has spanned almost nine decades since its inception to fight in the "Great War" of World War I. Among the 540,000 soldiers, the division has seen 16 Medal of Honor recipients, including Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt Jr., son of President Theodore Roosevelt. 4th Infantry Division warriors went into action in the Aisne-Marne campaign in July 1918, at which time its units were piecemealed and attached to several French infantry divisions. Almost a month later, the Division was reunited for the final days of the campaign. During the next four months, the 4th Infantry Division saw action on the front lines and as reserves. Suffering over 11,500 casualties in the final drive for the Allied victory, the 4th Infantry Division was the only division to serve in both the French and British sectors of the front. The American people once again called upon 4th Infantry Division warriors to serve in World War II. From staging areas in England, the Division trained for its major role in Operation Overlord (D-Day), the amphibious invasion of Europe on June 6th, 1944. The Division's 8th Infantry Regiment was the first Allied warrior unit to assault German forces on the Normandy Coast. It went ashore on Utah Beach and, for 26 days, pushed forward until reaching its objective and being relieved by the 101st Airborne Division. During this month long operation, the 4th Infantry Division sustained over 5000 casualties. Breaking out of the beachhead and expanding operations well into France, the Division was given the honor of being the first American unit to participate in the liberation of Paris. The Division quickly moved into the Hurtgen Forest and fought what was to be its fiercest battle. 4th Infantry Division warriors held their ground during the Battle of the Bulge; crossed the Rhine, then the Danube, and finally ceased its advance at the Isar River in southern Germany. Two decades passed before Division warriors would again see combat. When the 4th Infantry Division arrived in Vietnam in September 1966, its brigades were deployed to different locations. With the 1st Brigade near the South China Sea, 2nd Brigade in the central highlands, and the 3rd Brigade in the Mekong Delta, the 4th Infantry Division took part in 11 major campaigns during its five years in Vietnam. The 4th Infantry Division returned from Vietnam in December of 1970 and settled at Fort Carson, Colorado, where it reorganized as a mechanized unit and remained for 25 years. It was during the Division's time at Fort Carson that its nickname transitioned from the "Ivy" Division to the "Ironhorse" Division. The nickname, "Ironhorse" remains today in recognition of the Division's readiness for warrior contingency deployment worldwide. From: US Military Records
2007-08-10©bravehorseswarriors™11 AP Warriors, Places, & Events Education Services at Adjunct Professor LLC

Posted by adjunctprofessor at 11:58 PM EDT
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BRAVEHORSES WARRIORS 06 ROOSTER & VIETNAM
Mood:  celebratory
Now Playing: Wolf Moon by TYPE O NEGATIVE
BRAVEHORSES WARRIORS 06 ROOSTER & VIETNAM Vietnam Warriors Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Tribute to Vietnam Warriors Rooster by Alice in Chains Ain't Found A Way To Kill Me Yet Eyes Burn With Stinging Sweat Seems Every Path Leads Me To Nowhere Wife And Kids And Household Pet Army Green Was No Safe Bet The Bullets Scream To Me From Somewhere yeah They Come To Snuff The Rooster Yeah Here Come The Rooster You Know He Ain't Gonna Die Walkin' Tall Machine Gun Man They Spit On Me In My Homeland Gloria Sent Me Pictures Of My Boy Got My Pills 'Gainst Mosquito Death My Buddy's Breathin' His Dyin' Breath Oh God Please Won't You Help Me Make It Through

From: US Military Records 2007-08-05©bravehorseswarriors™06 AP Warriors, Places, & Events Education Services at Adjunct Professor LLC

Posted by adjunctprofessor at 11:29 PM EDT
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BRAVEHORSEa??S WARRIORS 5 Native American Warrior Heroism in WWII
Mood:  celebratory
Now Playing: Wolf Moon by TYPE O NEGATIVE
BRAVEHORSE’S WARRIORS 5 Native American Warrior Heroism in WWII Native American Warriors Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket Native American Warrior Heroism in WWII The war had ended in victory for the United Nations, and after a troubled period of readjustment and reorganization, peace came at last. The story of the Native American Warriors’ contribution to the winning of the war has been told only in part. As one of the Sioux Warriors said, "As a rule nowadays the fellows don't go in for heroics." But already the Native American Warriors’ record was impressive by the spring of 1945, there were 21,767 Native American Warriors in the Army, 1,910 in the Navy, 121 in the Coast Guard, and 723 in the Marines. These figures did not include officers, for whom no statistics were available. Several hundred Native American women are in the various branches of the services. The Standing Rock Agency, North Dakota, estimated that at least fifty girls from that jurisdiction were in uniform. The Office of Indian Affairs had recorded 71 awards of the Air Medal, 51 of the Silver Star, 47 of the Bronze Star Medal, 34 of the Distinguished Flying Cross, and two of the Congressional Medal of Honor. There were undoubtedly many more which had not been reported. Many of these ribbons were decorated with oak leaf clusters awarded in lieu of additional medals. It was not unusual to see an Air Medal with nine oak leaf clusters, or twelve, or even fourteen. The casualty lists were long. They came from theaters of war all over the world. There were many Native American Warriors in the prison camps of the Philippines after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor, and later there were many more on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. There were Native American Warriors in the 45th Division in Sicily and Italy. They were at Anzio, and they took part in the invasion on D-Day in Normandy. A Ute Warrior, LeRoy Hamlin, was with a small troop which made the first contact with the Russians across the Elbe on April 25. Another Ute, Harvey Natchees, was the first American soldier to ride into the center of Berlin. Pfc. Ira Hayes, Pima, of the Marines, was one of the six warriors who raised the flag on the summit of Mt. Suribachi. Once in a while, a Native American Warrior diving into a foxhole when shells began to burst, would find himself face to face with another Native American Warrior, and they would start talking about Native American problems as they waited for the enemy fire to cease. When there were Native American Warrior(s) in an outfit, they were highly respected for their fighting spirit. The Native American people at home had matched the record of their fighting warriors. More than forty thousand left the reservations during each of the war years to take jobs in ordnance depots, in aircraft factories, on the railroads, and in other war industries. The older men, the women, and the children, who stayed at home, increased their production of food in spite of the lack of help. Native Americans invested more than $17,000,000 of restricted funds in war bonds, and their individual purchases probably amount to twice that sum. They subscribed liberally to the Red Cross and to the Army and Navy Relief societies. The mothers of warriors organized War Mothers clubs in their communities, and every warrior received letters and gifts while he was in the service. The clubs helped to entertain the warriors who came home on furlough, and when the war was over, they made plans for war memorials in honor of fallen warriors. Reflecting the heroic spirit of Native American Warriors at war in every theater of action, the list of those specially selected to receive military honors grew steadily. We shall never know of all the courageous acts performed "with utter disregard for personal safety," but the proved devotion of all Native American peoples on the home front and the conspicuous courage of their sons and daughters in the various services entitled them to share in common the honors bestowed upon the Native American Warriors here noted on Bravehorse’s Warriors. “It is an honor for me to research, compile, and share the exploits and heroic acts of these and other Native American and American warriors with you,” Bravehorse! From: US Military Records 2007-08-04©bravehorseswarriors™05 AP Warriors, Places, & Events Education Services at Adjunct Professor LLC

Posted by adjunctprofessor at 11:25 PM EDT
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BRAVEHORSEa??S WARRIORS EDGAR ALLAN POE
Mood:  celebratory
Now Playing: Wolf Moon by TYPE O NEGATIVE
BRAVEHORSE’S WARRIORS 02 EDGAR ALLAN POE Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket United States Army Sergeant Major Edgar Allan Poe January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849 Warriors Citation Sergeant Major is the highest rank that can be attained by any Non-Commissioned Officer and Edgar Allan Poe held this rank at the age of 21. ANNABELLE LEE Author: Edgar Allan Poe It was many and many a year ago, In a kingdom by the sea, That a maiden there lived whom you may know By the name of Annabel Lee; And this maiden she lived with no other thought Than to love and be loved by me. I was a child and she was a child, In this kingdom by the sea; But we loved with a love that was more than love - I and my Annabel Lee; With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven Coveted her and me. And this was the reason that, long ago, In this kingdom by the sea, A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling My beautiful Annabel Lee; So that her highborn kinsman came And bore her away from me, To shut her up in a sepulcher In this kingdom by the sea. The angels, not half so happy in heaven, Went envying her and me Yes! that was the reason (as all men know, In this kingdom by the sea) That the wind came out of the cloud by night, Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee. But our love was stronger by far than the love Of those who were older than we Of many far wiser than we And neither the angels in heaven above, Nor the demons down under the sea, Can ever dissever my soul from the soul Of the beautiful Annabel Lee. For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; And the stars never rise but I feel the bright eyes Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side Of my darling, my darling, my life and my bride, In the sepulcher there by the sea, In her tomb by the sounding sea. From: historical accounts & records 2007-08-01©bravehorseswarriors™02 Education Services at Adjunct Professor LLC Warriors, Places, & Events AP

Posted by adjunctprofessor at 11:20 PM EDT
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